Haiti – First Baby Doc Now Aristide Calls Next

Haitians adjusting to the sudden return of one exiled ex-president could soon have another on their hands.

As former dictator Jean-Claude “Baby Doc” Duvalier held court with allies at an upscale hotel on Wednesday, ousted former President Jean-Bertrand Aristide sent out a letter saying he is ready to come back from six years of South African exile “today, tomorrow, at any time.”

“As far as I am concerned, I am ready,” he wrote in an e-mail distributed by supporters and posted online. “The purpose is very clear: To contribute to serving my Haitian sisters and brothers as a simple citizen in the field of education.”

Aristide was ousted in 2004, leaving Haiti aboard a U.S. plane as a small group of rebels neared the capital. His return has been a principal demand of his Fanmi Lavalas party, which has lost influence as electoral officials blocked it from participating in elections including the disputed Nov. 28 vote now under challenge — though Aristide himself has remained a widely popular figure.

He is two years younger than Duvalier, the now 59-year-old ex-dictator he spoke against as a Roman Catholic priest in the La Saline slum. Together the men represent the two main oppositional forces in Haitian politics over the last half century: stable, often brutal authoritarianism in favor of elites against charismatic populism that opponents said bordered on demagoguery.

According to Duvalier’s confidants the two men have never met. Their mutual presence in Haiti could cause long-simmering tensions to erupt.

Aristide did not endorse a candidate in the current race and has said he would not seek office if he came back.

Instead he said in the letter, whose authenticity was confirmed by Lavalas spokeswoman Maryse Narcisse, his return is necessary to help his countrymen and for his medical needs following six eye surgeries in his six years of exile.

“The unbearable pain experienced in the winter must be avoided in order to reduce any risk of further complications and blindness,” he said. South African winter begins in June.

“Let us hope that the Haitian and South African governments will enter into communication in order to make that happen in the next coming days,” he said.

Narcisse said supporters were eagerly awaiting his arrival, pending the delivery of a new Haitian passport.

Brian Concannon, a lawyer who has represented Aristide, says the ousted leader has applied but has never heard back from his homeland’s government.

The U.S. State Department reacted to the letter in a series of posts by spokesman P.J. Crowley on Twitter.

“This is an important period for Haiti. What it needs is calm, not divisive actions that distract from the task of forming a new government,” said one.

The other: “We do not doubt President Aristide’s desire to help the people of Haiti. But today Haiti needs to focus on its future, not its past.” (huh? Did I miss sonething there?)

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